Golf

What golf club flex should i use?

If you’re between 97 and 104 mph with the driver, you need a stiff flex. Regular – Now we are getting into the range where a majority of recreational golfers fall, and also where many LPGA pros fall. If you’re between 84 and 96 mph, regular is going to be best for you.

Considering this, do any golf pros use regular flex? Kramer’s 2006 “Golf Magazine” article cites a survey showing that just 2 percent of PGA Tour players and 10 percent of PGA Champions Tour players used regular flex shafts in their irons. He also notes that PGA Tour swing speeds average 110 mph, so the players favor a stiffer shaft to better control the club.

In regards to, what happens if my shaft is too flexible? If a golfer is using a shaft that is too flexible, here are the likely results: 1. The ball will possibly fly higher for any given loft. If the golfer is using the proper loft for his or her swing mechanics, this could cause a slight decrease from the golfer’s maximum potential distance.

Furthermore, what does shaft flex 5.0 mean? Regular – 5.0. Regular Plus – 5.5. Stiff – 6.0. Extra Stiff – 6.5. Extra Stiff Plus – 7.0.

Likewise, how fast should you swing a 7 iron? An average golfer will swing a seven iron about 75 mph. This number can change based on the weight of the club and if it is steel or graphite. The faster you swing a seven iron, the further it will go. If you can swing at about 85 mph, you will see distances closer to 165 yards.

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Is Stiff flex good for beginners?

Stiff Flex golf club shafts are not recommended for beginner golfers. Beginner golfers should instead use shafts with more give, like a regular or flexible golf shaft. Stiff flex shafts are only recommended for experienced golfers able to generate a high clubhead speed. Stiff shafts are firmer and harder to bend.

Does shaft flex matter in irons?

1) Shaft flex is a very important variable in fitting. Our testers saw variations of as much as 22 yards of distance from one flex to another. Getting the right flex is key to an optimal fit.

Is a 6.0 shaft Stiff?

Have you ever wondered what the number designation on your Project X shaft means? You know, the 5.0, 6.0, 6.5 and so on printed on the shaft. These numbers correspond with flexes from “regular” to “extra stiff plus”.

Will a stiffer shaft increase distance?

If the shaft flex is too stiff, your average distance will remain low.

Is there a big difference between regular and stiff flex?

What’s the difference between regular and stiff shafts? A stiff shaft is firmer and harder to bend than a regular shaft, and so more often than not, they’re also heavier in weight. As a rough rule of thumb, the more speed you generate, the stiffer your shafts should be.

How can I tell my swing speed?

Divide the average yardage by 2.3. This number represents your average club head speed in miles per hour, according to the book “Science and Golf III.” If 195 is your average drive distance yardage, 84.7 mph is your approximate swing speed.

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Is there a big difference between senior flex and regular flex?

Senior flex shafts are appropriate for golfers who swing between 75 and 90 mph and carry a driver about 180 to 200 yards. Regular flex shafts are designed for golfers who swing 90 to 100 mph and carry a driver about 200 to 240 yards.

Can a flexible shaft cause a slice?

When the clubhead gets to the ball, the shaft won’t unload properly and the face will remain slightly open, causing a slice. Other swing problems also can cause a slice, of course, but shafts that are too stiff can make the problem worse.

How do I know if my golf shaft is too stiff?

If your driver’s shaft is too stiff, the clubhead may not square with the ball at the point of impact, causing slices and fades. If you can’t feel the weight of the clubhead loading through the shaft, it’s probably too stiff, and can cause errors and issues associated with accuracy such as these.

What shaft is best for a slice?

Unlike the pros, you should look for shafts with weaker tip sections that allow for more release of the club head as it comes into impact. A more active tip section will generally allow for a faster rate of closure, which is beneficial to golfers suffering from a slice.

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